Mondays and Tuesdays and Wednesdays and Thursdays and Fridays

Micke Johansson was born in 1972. He grew up in Flerohopp in the middle of the Kingdom of Crystal, Sweden. At 16 years old Micke started to work at Orrefors glassworks and he became a master glassblower at the early age of 24.  

“For me, glass has only been an interesting work until I got the opportunity to go to Pilchuck Glasschool. When I got to see what the glass world could offer me I felt like something was missing. I wanted more than just blowing glass to other people. I wanted to create my own unique glass and art glass.”   

In January 2004 Micke started to work at Pukeberg glassworks where he could develop and produce his own art glass. April 1, 2011 was the big day when Micke opened up his hot shop on his own farm outside Örsjö. In his own studio, he has taken graal and ariel to new levels.  

Website: www.mickejohanskonstglas.se

Instagram: @mickejohanskonstglas

Graal and Swedish Overlay
When: Mondays and Tuesdays and Wednesdays and Thursdays and Fridays, Aug 5 - Aug 9
Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Dates: Aug 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Tuition $900.00
Instructor: Micke Johansson

In this class, we will focus on how to use only color bars on the inside and outside of the glass. We will make lots of Graal blanks with up to four different layers and up to seven or eight colors. On the Graal blanks, you have the chance to create and make your own unique patterns. To make the patterns you will use resistance tape to cover the blank and draw your figures on. Then you can cut the figures out with a small knife and expose the glass, then use sandblasting to take away layers of colors.

We are also going to use engraving machines to make details in your design.

When the blanks are finished, we are going to heat them up, cover them with clear glass, and make the design you want. There are no limits to what you can do with this technique. You set the limit.

We are also going to play with Swedish overlay. I’m going to show you different ways of making finished pieces without making patterns cold. The traditional Swedish way of working with the glass is using the heat from the furnace. Basically, that means “Don’t gather too cold.” Challenge yourself and have fun.

You need to bring color rods or you can purchase color at PGC. It’s also good to have scissors, a scalpel, and markers in different colors.

10 of 12 seats available.

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